Netflix–5 documentaries–reviews   Leave a comment


1) “Cheer”–6 episodes–5 hours and 57 minutes–interesting from various angles: the work these kids put in every day is phenomenal–don’t think most professional athletes could keep up with them. For many this is their only chance in life–some of the backstories are heartbreaking. Many of the routines are jaw-dropping. Their coach, Monica Aldama, expects the best of them, is hard on them but is there for each and every one of them when she is needed. Their injuries can make you cringe and you wonder, in the end, is it worth the trophy and, then, what, if anything, is there for these kids after the final competition?  Definitely worth seeing!
2) “The Silence of Others”–1 hour and 7 minutes–3 different stories intertwined chronicling Spain’s battles regarding the past, basically Franco’s rule and the present dealing with it. We see police attacking civilians, a wall built between loved ones, children who were taken away from their parents, laws made to prevent criminals from being prosecuted and, though meant not to it makes you compare what is happening today. It centers around an Amnesty Law passed in 1977 to forget the past as knocking down statues today in the USA hopes to attain!  In many instances, it tears at your heart such as an 88-year-old daughter given the bones of her father killed in his twenties and buried in a mass grave.
3) “Father Soldier Son”–1 hour and thirty-nine minutes. A very touching film about a man who fills all 3 roles. This is the story of the father, soldier and son who returns and what happens after. Very touching at times while hard to watch at certain points.
4) “The Last Dance”–10 episodes–8 hours and 11 minutes–Many see Michael Jordon as one of the great basketball players ever if not the greatest athlete ever and he will agree with you. Yes he is sure of himself, he feels he is very competitive and does not believes team should be spelled without an I and he is the I. The film revolves around him and the Bulls, the team he believes needed him and in many ways proved that was true. There is some time given to other players like Dennis Rodman who was finding (losing?) himself,  Scottie Pippen who always delivered but felt he was way underpaid, Magic Johnson, the coaches, owners but there is no forgetting this is about Jordan and his need to be the best at everything. I had two problems with the documentary with the first being a constant going back and forth in time and the second being too many basketball games which become repetitious over time as only one shows Jordon being responsible for a loss so the rest are of him making a basket from everywhere and anywhere.5) “The Business of Drugs”–6 episodes–4 hours and 16 minutes–Informative in a boring presentation.

Posted July 24, 2020 by greatmartin in Documentaries, ENTERTAINMENT, MOVIE REVIEW

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