Archive for the ‘GAY’ Category

REST IN PEACE–TO NEVER BE FORGOTTEN   Leave a comment

HOPEFULLY NO MORE WILL BE ADDED!

Victims’ Names

During this difficult time, we offer heartfelt condolences to the families of the 49 victims who lost their lives during the Pulse tragedy. To the families and friends of the victims, your city is with you and will continue to be with you as you deal with this unimaginable tragedy.

Stanley Almodovar III, 23 years old

Amanda Alvear, 25 years old

Oscar A Aracena-Montero, 26 years old

Rodolfo Ayala-Ayala, 33 years old

Antonio Davon Brown, 29 years old

Darryl Roman Burt II, 29 years old

Angel L. Candelario-Padro, 28 years old

Juan Chevez-Martinez, 25 years old

Luis Daniel Conde, 39 years old

Cory James Connell, 21 years old

Tevin Eugene Crosby, 25 years old

Deonka Deidra Drayton, 32 years old

Simon Adrian Carrillo Fernandez, 31 years old

Leroy Valentin Fernandez, 25 years old

Mercedez Marisol Flores, 26 years old

Peter O. Gonzalez-Cruz, 22 years old

Juan Ramon Guerrero, 22 years old

Paul Terrell Henry, 41 years old

Frank Hernandez, 27 years old

Miguel Angel Honorato, 30 years old

Javier Jorge-Reyes, 40 years old

Jason Benjamin Josaphat, 19 years old

Eddie Jamoldroy Justice, 30 years old

Anthony Luis Laureanodisla, 25 years old

Christopher Andrew Leinonen, 32 years old

Alejandro Barrios Martinez, 21 years old

Brenda Lee Marquez McCool, 49 years old

Gilberto Ramon Silva Menendez, 25 years old

Kimberly Morris, 37 years old

Akyra Monet Murray, 18 years old

Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo, 20 years old

Geraldo A. Ortiz-Jimenez, 25 years old

Eric Ivan Ortiz-Rivera, 36 years old

Joel Rayon Paniagua, 32 years old

Jean Carlos Mendez Perez, 35 years old

Enrique L. Rios, Jr., 25 years old

Jean C. Nives Rodriguez, 27 years old

Xavier Emmanuel Serrano Rosado, 35 years old

Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz, 24 years old

Yilmary Rodriguez Solivan, 24 years old

Edward Sotomayor Jr., 34 years old

Shane Evan Tomlinson, 33 years old

Martin Benitez Torres, 33 years old

Jonathan Antonio Camuy Vega, 24 years old

Juan P. Rivera Velazquez, 37 years old

Luis S. Vielma, 22 years old

Franky Jimmy Dejesus Velazquez, 50 years old

Luis Daniel Wilson-Leon, 37 years old

Jerald Arthur Wright, 31 years old

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Posted June 14, 2016 by greatmartin in FRIENDS, GAY, LIFE EVENTS, LOVE, Uncategorized

HALLOWEEN: THE GAY HOLIDAY   1 comment


There is a distinct difference between cross dressers, drag queens and the neighbors who put a lamp shade on their head for Halloween. And neither category necessarily means the person is gay or has a sexual identity problem. I don’t profess to be an expert on any of these subjects though I have enjoyed Jim Bailey as Barbra Streisand in his one man show in Las Vegas. I am not a fan of ‘Dame Edna’ but I loved Charles Pierce and who didn’t laugh at Flip Wilson as Geraldine?

Since ancient days men have gone on stage dressed as women and the Shakespearean era was known for not allowing women on stage. There is an excellent movie starring Billy Crudup and Claire Danes with the latter playing female figures such as Desdemona on stage until the king decrees that women can do stage roles . There was also “Shakespeare in Love” where Gwyneth Paltrow had to play a young man auditioning for the role of Romeo. Who hasn’t laughed at Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon in drag in “Some Like It Hot” or enjoyed Dustin Hoffman as “Tootsie”?

What does all this have to do with Halloween being a Gay holiday? What follows is MY experience and what I observed over the years. Now I haven’t been into a gay bar in years so I don’t know if this Halloween we will still see hundreds of Judy Garlands and Nuns but at one time both were a symbol of the holiday.

In the 1950s and 1960s many States had laws on the books–and some probably still do–that a man could not dress as a woman or he could be arrested. In fact I went to a number of bars, called the Bird Circuit, in New York where men were not allowed to touch each other. Some had dancing in a back room and if a bartender thought a customer looked suspicious, like a plainclothesman, he would flick the lights in the backroom from a switch under the bar and the men would immediately stop dancing.

Back then there were infamous drag balls in Harlem that were known far and wide attended by many socialites. The costumes were outrageous, each one more glamorous than the next one and though illegal it went on without a hitch. Dressing up in costume for Halloween became high art and some of the grandest balls were held that night.

I vaguely remember being in the Faision D’Or bar one Halloween sort of surprised by all the women who were in there–hey I was young back then–only to slowly became aware it was men. Living in New York drag shows were nothing new and in fact there was a nightclub that catered to tourists where the cast was all men dressed as women except for one woman dressed as a man. Yes even back then drag was an accepted form of entertainment.

I don’t remember the name of the bar on Miami Beach that was off LIncoln Road on Alton Road that in the early 1960s did drag revues and a few blocks south was the famous Jewel Box Revue that traveled all over the USA and would be nodded to by the character Paul in “A Chorus Line” in 1975.

There being drag in New York and Florida really didn’t surprise me but I was surprised to find a drag bar–don’t remember the name–in Memphis, Tennessee, when I moved there in 1969. I, also, remember the high caliber , finely polished drag show I saw in Sidney, Australia, a few years later where it was all live music including the singing but that’s another blog.

Halloween as a big gay holiday hit home to me when I moved to Fort Lauderdale in 1979 and went to The Sandpiper nightclub that October 31. At that time we had 4 different gay magazines/bar guides/newspapers and the ‘Best Costume’ events were being held in every bar–gay or nongay–but the biggest awards/ prizes were in the gay bars. That was the night I thought the whole world was made up of Judy Garland!

THE FOLLOWING WILL TELL YOU ABOUT HALLOWEEN BEING A GAY HOLIDAY

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/irene-monroe/halloween-americas-gay-holiday_b_1034013.html 

FOR THE BIGGEST PARTY OF ALL

http://www.jumponmarkslist.com/us/fl/fll/events/wicked-wilton-manors-gay-halloween.php

Posted October 31, 2015 by greatmartin in GAY

MUST SEE FILM ABOUT A GAY ICON ON TV!   Leave a comment

TRAILER

Larry Kramer is my hero as an activist and as a writer. It is due to him and ACT-UP in 1987, which he organized, that AIDS drugs prices were brought down and made available to many who couldn’t afford them. It is due to him, in 1983 that the Gay Men’s Health Crisis was founded to help people with AIDS.

In 1978 he wrote a book called “Faggots” that warned gay people because of their promiscuity there would come a day of reckoning.

In 1983 he wrote an essay “1, 112 & Counting” that pointed the finger at the government and gay people for their failure to not recognize AIDS as an epidemic.

In 1985 his played “A Normal Heart” brought AIDS to the stage and tears to the eyes of everyone who saw it just as the revival on Broadway a couple of years ago and the film of it last years still brings tears to the eyes of those watching it.

This year he published “American People: Volume 1 Scenes For My Heart”–an 800+ opus seeing our country through gay eyes.

He had a liver transplant in 2001, is a long time AIDS survivor, and married his partner in the hospital not knowing if he would ever walk out of that room.

Larry Kramer is known for his anger, an anger that turned off many gay people, but first and foremost he is a man who believes what he is saying and says it to everyone including presidents, governors, doctors and/or anyone who doesn’t want to hear him or his message.

He celebrated his 80th birthday this past Thursday,  June 25, and the Supreme Court gave him a birthday present the next day.

WATCH “LARRY KRAMER IN LOVE & ANGER” ON HBO, TOMORROW, MONDAY, JUNE 29, AT 9 PM (and to be repeated during the month of July)

Posted June 28, 2015 by greatmartin in ENTERYTAINMENT, GAY

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GAY FILM GENRE PART 1   Leave a comment

In 1993 I sent in a check to help make the groundbreaking 1981 “The Celluloid Closet” book by Vito Russo into a documentary and I would like to think that the award winning film was due to me though in no way was it!

As a gay kid and teenager in the 1940s and 1950s who was an avid moviegoer I had to ‘read’ into films what I didn’t see up on the screen. What I did see were the effeminate butlers or male secretaries or, once in awhile, hinted at, the gay man as a murderer and/or a psycho.

Vito Russo, first in his book and then in the documentary, covered how eventually the gay genre of movies came into their own. In 1946 we had to imagine that Glen Ford spurned George Macready in “Gilda” and the latter got revenge by marrying Rita Hayworth. In the 1951 “A Streetcar Named Desire” film version the fact that Blanche’s husband had been gay was obliquely referred to but ‘out’ gay men were still having to commit suicide under ’the movie code’. In 1962 Arthur Miller’s play “A View From The Bridge”, directed by Sidney Lumet, had to be made as a Italian-French production due to one man accusing another of being gay and kissing him full on the mouth.  In 1965 Robert Redford played a closeted gay man in “Inside Daisy Clover” and in 1968 Frank Sinatra as “The Detective” investigates a murder and a suicide.

In 1970 a milestone in American gay cinema finally hit the mainstream big screen when the play “The Boys In The Band” revolving around 8 out gay men and 1 possible in the closet friend. Today it has a rating of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes and even back then  the reviews were favorable including those for the actors and the direction by William Friedkin, the latter in 1980 directing Al Pacino in the film “Cruising” which looked at the gay S & M scene.

An aside–the Lesbian movie history takes a different path so I am not getting into that aspect here except to relate the story about the adaptation of Lillian Helman’s “The Children’s Hour” play to the screen first in 1934 when Lesbians weren’t allowed to be portrayed on the screen so it was called “These Three” and sold as a movie about ‘a lie’

Posted April 6, 2015 by greatmartin in ENTERTAINMENT, GAY

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